txchnologist:

The Chance To Dance Again

by Michael Keller

We highlighted the TED talk of Hugh Herr a couple of weeks ago. But his work is too important and beautiful to leave to just one post.

The MIT associate professor of media arts and sciences is making prosthetic limbs and exoskeletons that restore function in those who have lost legs from injury or disease. This set of gifs focuses on his team’s BiOM powered ankle and foot prosthesis

"Bionics is not only about making people stronger and faster," he said during the talk. "Our expression, our humanity can be embedded into electromechanics."

To prove his point, Herr and fellow researchers studied dance movement to replace the lower leg that professional dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost after last year’s Boston marathon bombing. He concluded his talk by bringing Haslet-Davis on the stage to perform a bionic rumba. 

Read More

tastefullyoffensive:

One star. [x]

tastefullyoffensive:

One star. [x]

emt-monster:

nurse-on-duty:

Ectopia cordis

It’s a congenital malformation in which the heart is abnormally located either partially or totally outside of the thorax. The ectopic heart can be found along a spectrum of anatomical locations, including the neck, chest, or abdomen. In most cases, the heart protrudes outside the chest through a split sternum

emt-monster:

nurse-on-duty:

Ectopia cordis

It’s a congenital malformation in which the heart is abnormally located either partially or totally outside of the thorax. The ectopic heart can be found along a spectrum of anatomical locations, including the neck, chest, or abdomen. In most cases, the heart protrudes outside the chest through a split sternum

paramedicine:

This figure is far too small!

For my readers: What are the retirement rates like in your country? If higher, what do you think has contributed to the number?

Tips For Trauma Pros: Seat Belt Sign

regionstraumapro:

We see seat belt signs at our trauma center with some regularity. There are plenty of papers out there that detail the injuries that occur and the need for a low threshold for surgically exploring these patients. I have not been able to find specific management guidelines, and want to share some tidbits I have learned over the years. Yes, this is based on anecdotal experience, but it’s the best we have right now.

image

Tips for trauma professionals:

  • Common injuries involve the terminal ileum, proximal jejunum, and sigmoid colon. My observation is that location in the car is associated with the injury location, probably because of the location of the seat belt buckle. In the US, drivers buckle on the right, and I’ve seen more terminal ileum and buckethandle injuries in this group. Front seat passengers buckle on the left, and I tend to see proximal jejunum and sigmoid injuries more often in them.
  • Seat belt sign on physical exam requires abdominal CT for evaluation, regardless of age. The high incidence of significant injury mandates this test.
  • Seat belt sign plus any anomaly on CT requires evaluation in the OR. The only exception would be a patient with minimal fluid only in the pelvis with an unremarkable abdominal exam. But I would watch them like a hawk.
  • In patients who cannot be examined clinically (e.g. severe TBI), a rising WBC count or lactate beginning on day 2 after adequate resuscitation should prompt a trip to the OR. This is an indirect method for detecting injured bowel or mesentery.
  • Laparoscopy may be used in patients with equivocal findings. Excessive blood, bile tinged fluid, succus, or lots of fibrin deposits on the bowel should prompt conversion to laparotomy. Tip: place all ports distant to the seat belt mark. The soft tissues are frequently disrupted, and gas may leak into this pocket prohibiting good insufflation of the peritoneal cavity.
  • If in doubt, open the abdomen. It’s bad form to put in the scope, see something odd, and walk away. Remember, any abnormal finding after trauma is related to trauma until proven otherwise. It’s almost never pre-existing disease.

Related posts:

How Nursing Students leave the bathroom

kamikaze-nurse:

Everybody like,

image

zerostatereflex:

Fertilization

A beautifully done animation on how you became you.

See the full video here as I left out some really cool parts.

From 300 or so million down to ONE.

YOU. MADE. IT.

Edit:
Let’s think about this for a moment. The US population is roughly 330 million human beings. For the purposes of demonstration, take almost the ENTIRE POPULATION OF THE US and put them on the west coast, packed as tightly as possible. You’re just chillin, somewhere south of Pasadena let’s say, trying to get free, sweating and hungry with a desire you’ve never experienced before. You know you’re going to die though you think you’ll be the one to make it.

Then like the ULTIMATE hunger games of GENETIC WIN you traverse across the country desperately trying to get to the goal with absolute disregard for the other 299 million people. Your mom, dad, brother, sister, grandma, everyone you’ve ever known dies. You somehow get to the end. Where you bust through a gated base only to be sealed in and combined with another human to make a brand NEW human.

300,000,000 and you’re the only survivor. And your prize is to essentially die and reconstitute into a new being.

That’s awesome.

staceythinx:

Volume Rendering CT scans by voxel123 

scienceyoucanlove:

The cervical spinal cordBy removing the rear arches of the neck (cervical) vertebra and the fibrous covering (dura) over the spinal cord one sees the cervical spinal cord and its nerves. The blood vessels nourishing the cord and vertebral column and the origin of the cord from the brain are clearly shown.Read more: http://bit.ly/1le0rnD
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

The cervical spinal cord

By removing the rear arches of the neck (cervical) vertebra and the fibrous covering (dura) over the spinal cord one sees the cervical spinal cord and its nerves. The blood vessels nourishing the cord and vertebral column and the origin of the cord from the brain are clearly shown.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1le0rnD

source 

moshita:

Skulls made of toy soldiers and flowers

Mr. Joe Black | facebook

Years ago, death was considered a natural part of life and most people died at home, surrounded by families. Today, most people die in hospitals and death is commonly regarded as a medical failure rather than a natural event.
Emergency Nursing made Incredibly Easy (2007) Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (via traumabarbie)
kqedscience:

NAME! THAT! HORRIFYING! DISEASE!
"Can you match these old-timey illustrations with the correct illnesses?"
Take the vicemag quiz (some images are NSFW): http://goo.gl/HKPrbS

kqedscience:

NAME! THAT! HORRIFYING! DISEASE!

"Can you match these old-timey illustrations with the correct illnesses?"

Take the vicemag quiz (some images are NSFW): http://goo.gl/HKPrbS

Instructional Learning

neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain

For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.

By Voxy.

eviscerator:

Tree-barking of the aorta

Before rupture occurs, infamous ‘tree bark’ grooves appear on the inner layer of the aorta.

They are basically stretch marks of the aorta and can be seen in cases of Marfan-style dilatation of the aortic root. The reason you can’t see them in cases of atherosclerosis is because the markings are masked by plaques.