moshita:

Skulls made of toy soldiers and flowers

Mr. Joe Black | facebook

Years ago, death was considered a natural part of life and most people died at home, surrounded by families. Today, most people die in hospitals and death is commonly regarded as a medical failure rather than a natural event.
Emergency Nursing made Incredibly Easy (2007) Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (via traumabarbie)
kqedscience:

NAME! THAT! HORRIFYING! DISEASE!
"Can you match these old-timey illustrations with the correct illnesses?"
Take the vicemag quiz (some images are NSFW): http://goo.gl/HKPrbS

kqedscience:

NAME! THAT! HORRIFYING! DISEASE!

"Can you match these old-timey illustrations with the correct illnesses?"

Take the vicemag quiz (some images are NSFW): http://goo.gl/HKPrbS

Instructional Learning

neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain

For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.

By Voxy.

eviscerator:

Tree-barking of the aorta

Before rupture occurs, infamous ‘tree bark’ grooves appear on the inner layer of the aorta.

They are basically stretch marks of the aorta and can be seen in cases of Marfan-style dilatation of the aortic root. The reason you can’t see them in cases of atherosclerosis is because the markings are masked by plaques.

ouremssite:

This makes a lot of sense.

ouremssite:

This makes a lot of sense.

unexplained-events:

Top picture: 1987 Dr. Zbigniew Religa monitors his patient’s vitals after a 23 hour long heart transplant surgery. His assistant is asleep in the corner. Photograph taken by James Stanfield.

Bottom picture: His patient who survived and actually went on to outlive Dr. Religa.

Dr. Religa was also the first surgeon to graft an artificial valve using materials from human corpses. He lead a team that completed the first successful heart transplantation in Poland. Him and his team obtained the Brusseis Eureka award for developing an implantable pump for a pneumatic heart assistance system.

mucholderthen:

Emilo Amade via frontal-cortex:
A mega-graphic of a lifesize human person made up of 10 magazine-spreads, a project from El Mundo.

All ten double spreads were put together in order to get a real size human body.
Art by from left to right and from top to bottom: 1- Emilio Amade, 2- Chema Matía, 3- Rafa Estrada, 4- Isabel González, 5- Mariano Zafra, 6- Beatriz Santacruz, 7 Isabel González y Beatriz Santacruz, 8- Mario Chimeno, Mariano Zafra and 10- Emilio Amade. Research done by Julio and Angel from El Mundo.

http://www.behance.net/gallery/Human-Body/452350

mucholderthen:

Emilo Amade via frontal-cortex:

A mega-graphic of a lifesize human person made up of 10 magazine-spreads, a project from El Mundo.

All ten double spreads were put together in order to get a real size human body.

Art by from left to right and from top to bottom: 1- Emilio Amade, 2- Chema Matía, 3- Rafa Estrada, 4- Isabel González, 5- Mariano Zafra, 6- Beatriz Santacruz, 7 Isabel González y Beatriz Santacruz, 8- Mario Chimeno, Mariano Zafra and 10- Emilio Amade. Research done by Julio and Angel from El Mundo.

http://www.behance.net/gallery/Human-Body/452350

totallytransparent:

Transparent X-Ray GIFMade by Totally Transparent

totallytransparent:

Transparent X-Ray GIF
Made by Totally Transparent

biomedicalephemera:

Anatomy and Position of the Kidney in the body

The kidney is a fascinating and under-appreciated organ. Even its name is interesting: while the Greek nephros and the Latin renes are both used as medical terms for the kidney and its anatomy, the origin of the common name in English - “kidney” - is actually unknown. It may be from the Old English terms cwið (womb) + ey (egg), from its shape, but there is no clear consensus on its origins.

The kidney serves many functions, but its most obvious is creating urine. The process of doing that is surprisingly complex, and involves regulation of blood pressure, re-absorbing vital nutrients, excreting urea from protein catabolism, and secreting hormones such as erythropoietin (which stimulates red blood cell creation).

These are four major sections of the kidney:

  • Capsule - A tough, fibrous layer of tissue, surrounded by a thick layer of fat, which protects the kidney.
  • Cortex - Just inside the capsule, the outermost layer of the kidney itself, which contains renal corpuscules and tubules. Ultrafiltration and erythropoietin production happens here.
  • Medulla -  The inner tissue of the kidney, split up into renal pyramids. This is where the arteries split up, serum comes out of the blood, and ions and glucose are processed.
  • Renal Pelvis - This is the convergence point of the major calcyes, and funnels urine into the ureter, which goes to the bladder. The transitional epithelium in this section of the kidney is the cause of many types of kidney cancers.

Anatomy: Descriptive and Applied. Henry Gray, 1918.

thenewenlightenmentage:

Eyes: The Windows to Your Health

Your eyes are tiny spheres of wonder. A doctor can find warning signs of high blood pressure, diabetes, and a whole range of other systemic health issues, just by examining your eyes. Ophthalmologist Neal Adams explains why the eye’s tissues and blood vessels make such a good barometer for wellness.

moshita:

Anatomy Cushion Covers

hellopretty

thenursingblog:

Charts & Figures: Know Your Abdominal Pains

thenursingblog:

Charts & Figures: Know Your Abdominal Pains